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Steganography and Stonehenge

Another post about new things I’ve been learning lately… Always random topics!

Stumbled across the word “steganography” so I looked it up. It’s the science of writing hidden messages in a way no one knows the message is there. An example of this is invisible ink.

There are some pretty wacky things that have been done, like: (these are from Wikipedia)

  • Hidden messages on messenger’s body — also used in ancient Greece. Herodotus tells the story of a message tattooed on a slave‘s shaved head, hidden by the growth of his hair, and exposed by shaving his head again. The message allegedly carried a warning to Greece about Persian invasion plans. This method has obvious drawbacks, such as delayed transmission while waiting for the slave’s hair to grow, and the restrictions on the number and size of messages that can be encoded on one person’s scalp.
  • During World War II, the French Resistance sent some messages written on the backs of couriers using invisible ink.
  • Messages written in Morse code on knitting yarn and then knitted into a piece of clothing worn by a courier

That is pretty strange stuff! How do people think of these things???

The most impressive example was this. Here’s the original photo:

Looking at this photo, you would never know that there’s a hidden image in here. According to Wikipedia, “The hidden image is revealed by removing all but the two least significant bits of each color component and a subsequent normalization.” And the end result is that you see this photo:

Whoa! That’s nuts!

The other thing I have been learning about is archaeology. I am reading a book called The Lost Empire of Atlantis and as I read I have found it helpful to Google the different things talked about. It’s totally fascinating!

Stonehenge is an example of megaliths, large stones used in construction. I didn’t realize that there are so many megaliths in different countries.

LIke Er Lannic in Brittany (northwest France) — some of the stones are submerged.

 

Or Almendres Cromlech in Portugal.

 

 

In Italy (Montalbano Elicana).

 

There are others too!

The author says that all building of the European stone circles ceased around 1450 BC. His premise is that the Minoans influenced the building of stone circles. 1450 BC is around the time of a large volcanic eruption at Thera, which destroyed the Minoan civilization.

I’m not archaeologist or historian, but I do find all this stuff quite fascinating.

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1 Comment

  • Reply Glen Nielsen

    I am scouring this post for the cipher to decrypt the embedded hidden message … I will let you know when I find it …

    November 23, 2011 at 11:50 pm
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